TITLE INSURANCE PRIMER

TITLE ISSUES

The job of searching the public records to identify existing rights and interests is not an easy task. The title searcher or abstracter reviews the public records to find all aspects of title, which can be seen and recognized. From the title search, the title examiner produces an opinion of title, from which the Company will issue its insurance.

In many areas, the title to a property can be traced back to a royal grant, charter, or the United States government. In many areas, titles are not traced back that far; instead, local custom or title insurance company requirements dictate a shorter search.

There are few titles, if any, that have a perfect history from their source, or root, to the present day. Each transfer of ownership is a "link" in what is referred to as the "chain of title." As each transaction or link takes place, there is a potential for a problem. Even if the entire chain of title appears to be in order, the chain is still subject to interpretation. When searching a title, what we are trying to determine are the various rights and interests that make up each link in the chain as it has passed from one owner to another.

A "title" is composed of three basic elements.

  • Rights and interests that are disclosed in the public records or by physical inspection of the property, i.e., deeds, mortgages, leases, etc., parties in possession, utility easements, etc.
  • Rights and interests that are not recorded but exist, i.e., limitations imposed by laws and statutes, etc.
  • Rights and interests that are hidden, i.e., forgeries, secret marriages and unknown heirs.

Every title is made up of many different "rights" and "interests" that may be owned by different people. The "owners" of the property own the most valuable of the property's rights and interests, but other people may also have rights to the property, such as easements for utilities or mortgages, etc.

Each title can be compared to sticks in a bundle. The rights and interests are represented by the sticks. The "owners" own what we call a "fee simple" title, that is, they have purchased the most vital and valuable sticks including rights of possession, use, occupancy, enjoyment, inheritance, etc. Also, within the bundle are sticks that may be owned by other parties. These are called encumbrances and may consist of easements, mortgages, liens, etc.

When a person purchases a parcel of real estate, it is not only the physical property itself that he or she acquires, but the sellers rights and interests, "the seller's title," in the property. It is essential for the prospective purchaser to know before the transaction takes place, precisely what rights or interests the seller can convey. The purchaser also needs to know who else may have rights or interest in the property, and about any encumbrances against the property that may affect the use or enjoyment of the land. The title search must cover all these rights and interests.